Thursday, November 24, 2016

Are tides related to the moon or is it a north-south relationship

Everyone knows that the tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon. It is also told that if the moon is on one side of the globe then on the other-side it also will be high tide. This is a very interesting relation and should be tested if it is true. Everywhere the moon is at 90 degrees the water will be pulled and there is a high tide. As water is very flexible it should rise at the right moment the moon passes from the east to the west. High tide should then occur when the moon passes the meridian or passes at the 90 degree point for a certain location. Lets put this to the test.

10 Locations and relation moon and tides

Based on source (1) I came with the local time for the high-tide and based on source (2) for the moon-time passing the meridian. The following data is for 25 November 2016:
  • Reykjavik Iceland: moon = 10:25, high-tide = 10:46, checks out;
  • Skopun, Faroe Islands: moon = 9:22, high-tide = 11:17, tide is 2 hours slow;
  • Den Helder Netherlands: moon = 9:34, high-tide = 9:42, checks out;
  • Ireland: moon = 9:20, high-tide = 15:40, high-tide is 6 hours before and after, moon coincides with lowtide;
  • Saint-Gilles-Croix-de-Vie, France: moon = 9:56, high-tide = 7:41, 2 hours to quick;
  • Hammonds Plains, Canada: moon = 8:57, high-tide = 3:32, 5 hours to quick;
  • Ponta Delgada, Portugal: moon = 9:40, high-tide = 6:34, 3 hours to quick;
  • La Orotava, Spain: moon = 10:29, high-tide = 5:30, 5 hours to quick;
  • Bahamas: moon = 9:07, high-tide = 4:10, 5 hours to quick;
  • Barbados: moon = 9:00, high-tide = 12:05, 3 hours to late.
If you do a statistical regression analysis on this data you will find that the relationship moon-time and high-tide-time is unprovable, as apparently the difference between moon-time and high-tide-time simply is to big.

Relation to latitude and longitude

Some time ago I did a statistical regression analysis of the tides comparing the positions of these and other locations on the earth. I did this in order to know if there is a relationship between the tides and latitude and/ or longitude. This analysis was based on time (GMT data of 8 November 2016) for good comparison. In this analysis we prove the following: H0 = there is no relationship, H1 = there is a relationship between the tides and latitude or longitude. It gave the following results: 
  • high tide vs Latitude F-test = 0,173 T-test = 0,589
  • high tide vs Longitude F-test = 0,016 < 0,05 test fails
  • low tide vs Latitude F-test = 0,468 T-test = 0,967
  • low tide vs Longitude F-test = 0,282 T-test = 0,751.
Striking is the fact that the Longitude high-tide F-test failed, actually suggesting that there is no east-west based relation with the tides. For the Latitude all test pass and give good results also. This actually can support the theory that tides have a north-south relation and given the previous results for the moon and tides no east-west relation. So if this actually is the case, then the next question would be what is causing this?

PS: the forgoing statistical regression analysis has been based on 15 locations, which is the minimal needed for this kind of analysis. The reliability would improve if this can be done for over 50 or 100 locations worldwide.

Additional proof on north-south tides

If you go to the source (3) (added on 1 December 2016) and select Ocean, Currents and Currents projected on AE (flat earth) you will get the following picture. Very very striking on this is the circular outward movement of the tides, with the north-pole as a centre aka the cause of the tides going outward. This is the same effect as when you trow a stone into water. This absolutely suggests that tides are caused by something at the north-pole. The picture confirms the forgoing found theory that tides are north-south based and not moon related aka east-west based. Based on the tides a flat earth model makes much much more sense.


Sources:
(1) https://www.worldtides.info/
(2) https://www.timeanddate.com
(3) https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/ocean/surface/currents/azimuthal_equidistant added 1-12-2016

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